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Fidelia Fielding (1827-1908)

Fidelia Hoscott Fielding is considered the last speaker and preserver of the Mohegan Pequot language. She and her grandmother, Martha Uncas, conversed in their native dialect. Four diaries she left are now preserved and used in the reconstruction of the Mohegan and other related Indian languages. Fidelia called herself Dji'ts Bud dnaca, meaning "Flying Bird."

Following Fidelia's marriage to William Fielding, she continued to live in the traditional Mohegan lifestyle. She remained something of a loner, and did not participate in the Green Corn Festivals or Mohegan Church Ladies Sewing Society meetings. Fidelia was the last to live in the traditional style log dwelling.

Fielding passed on many Mohegan traditions to Gladys Tantaquidgeon. From her, Gladys learned the stories of the Makiawisug, or Little People. She also gave Gladys a belt once belonging to Martha Uncas.

“Never forget it”
– Emma Baker
“We are no longer the little old tribe that lives upon the hill. We are now the nation that lives upon the hill.”
– Ralph Sturges
9
Chiefs in the 20th century
Gladys Tantaquidgeon
10th generation of Chief Uncas
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